Frieschepalen

Frieschepalen (Fryske Peallen) lies at the border with the province of Groningen, and neighbours the villages of Siegerswoude and Ureterp. Frieschepalen was founded in the 18th century as a peat mining village in the high peatland areas. The village is situated on the A7 motorway from Heerenveen to Groningen.

Frieschepalen (Fryske Peallen) lies at the border with the province of Groningen, and neighbours the villages of Siegerswoude and Ureterp. Frieschepalen was founded in the 18th century as an exploitation village in the high peatland areas.  The village is situated on the A7 motorway from Heerenveen to Groningen.

The 'palen' (posts) in the village's name refers to the boundary posts along the border with Groningen.  Frieschepalen only became an independent village in 1953. Before then, Frieschepalen was part of Siegerswoude.

History

From around 1660, the Grote Veenvaart (Great Canal) to Bakkeveen was dug, in order to make use of the peatland in the north-east of Opsterland.  This canal makes a detour to the south-east at Frieschepalen with a lock and drawbridge.  There stood a few houses and an inn.  The canal has been filled in, and the Tolheksleane is now the village's main artery, an avenue of beautiful oaks and buildings (primarily detached houses), a few farms and a chapel with a spire from 1928.

The remains of a sconce can also be seen in the landscape of Frieschepalen.  At the start of the Eighty Years' War, Friesland's peace had to be defended with the use of sconces, small protective fortifications, at strategic locations.  At the end of the 16th century, a sconce was also raised where Frieschepalen now stands.  The sconce was not maintained, was rebuilt in 1672 and then left to fall apart.